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Please, do not miss this!

March 04, 2021

Please, do not miss this!

I first saw Immersive Van Gogh, also known as Carrières de Lumières, in French when I was visiting Les Baux-de-Provence, a small town between St Remy de Provence and Maussane les Alpilles in Provence, France.

I rave about a lot of things but this experience is at the very top of my list. As far as I’m concerned, you need to STOP what you are doing and find out if this show is going to be near you. If so, please get tickets immediately as they are selling out fast, and go see this extraordinary experience.

Les Baux is a small town built into the stone top of les Alpilles mountains. It is topped by the remnants of an old castle that overlooks the plains. The village is officially classified and labeled as "one of the most beautiful villages in France."

Below the village is a limestone quarry excavated in the 1800s. The quarry is huge and now home to the audio-visual show known as the Carrières de Lumières. It began in 1976 and is known as the Cathédrale d'Images. Every year a show is created using the huge rock walls as the backdrop for the sound and light show of individual artists’ work.

As you enter the dark space you are surrounded by the projected Images that cover the many facets of walls, floors, and ceilings. Music flows, intensely filling the space. You walk around immersed in the world of the artist. Instead of observing the art from the outside, here you enter it. The experience is bigger than life. You move around, your senses engulfed as you observe the moving images from different angles. It feels as if you are inserted into the painting as the artist is envisioning it.

I found the experience reminiscent of walking into a Cathedral that is so majestic that you know you are seeing something beyond the everyday, something that is touched by a higher spirit. It is both invigorating and humbling. As you leave, you know you’ve encountered something that is very personal and special—It renders you speechless.

I can only repeat if it is near you please do not miss it.

     

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To complete the experience, how about a French dinner? Make a Blanquette de Veau or veal stew. You can make it a day or two before and just reheat it when you are ready to serve. It’s delicious served with white rice or wide noodles, your favorite bottle of white or red wine, and a simple green salad with a light vinaigrette. It’s a great way to finish the day. 

 

Le Kitchen Cookbook a workbook Blanquette de Veau recipe

Blanquette de Veau or Veal Stew

This stew is a very popular French dish. It is served with white rice and a wedge of lemon. This is the version my mother made and I like it because of its simplicity. This type of stew is called a white stew, because nothing in it has been browned. 

Serves: 6
Prep time: 20 minutes
Total time: 2 hours 20 minutes

 

Ingredients

1 medium yellow onion, diced small
3 carrots sliced in half and sliced into ¼” disks
½ cup flour
Salt and pepper
4 lbs veal chunks for stewing (I often buy more than 4 lbs because the meat shrinks as it cooks. For 6 people, I may buy 6 lbs of meat, knowing that I will have leftovers.)
5 cups low-salt chicken bouillon (Add more if you are using more meat; you want to just cover the meat.)
1 bay leaf
½ cup heavy cream
1½ lemons cut into wedges (one per person)
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
 

Directions

  1. In a Dutch oven sauté the onion over medium heat. Let it get transparent without browning it. After 5 minutes add the carrots and cook 8 more minutes.
  2. Place the flour, salt, and pepper in a plastic bag and mix well. Add a handful of meat at a time and coat with flour. Continue until all veal is coated.
  3. Place into pan with onions and mix well.
  4. Add enough broth to cover meat and bring to a boil. Add bay leaf, reduce and let simmer for 1½ to 2 hours.
  5. Check that you have at least 2 inches of liquid in pot. As it is cooking, add more water or broth if needed.
  6. When done, veal needs to be fork tender. That is important because the veal can be chewy if it isn’t cooked long enough.
  7. Taste the sauce and adjust the flavors with chicken bouillon and salt and pepper.
  8. If the sauce hasn’t thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon. Use a slotted spoon to remove the veal into a bowl. Cover with foil.
  9. Raise the heat and continue to cook, letting the sauce evaporate, being careful not to let it burn.
  10. To thicken, add a flour slurry to the sauce and continue cooking 2 to 3 minutes while it thickens.
  11. Before serving, add ½ cup of heavy cream.
  12. Serve with a wedge of lemon.

 

Here is the link to the show

https://vangoghexhibit.ca/

 

If you haven't already, get on the list to be notified when the book is available. Click Here  

 

Kamala Harris

 

 





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